Image of two men kissingHomosexuality in Eighteenth-Century England: A Sourcebook compiled by Rictor Norton

The Trial of Martin Mackintosh

July 1726


Introduction

This is one of the series of trials in 1726 following the police investigation of Mother Clap's molly house and the related molly subculture. Mackintosh was charged with the misdemeanor of having attempted to commit sodomy upon Joseph Sellers (an undercover police officer) on November 12, 1725. The trial contains details of an argument between two gay men which resulted in one of them revealing the gay subculture to the police.

Rictor Norton


Joseph Sellers: P—— carried me and others to several Sodomitical Houses, in order to detect some Persons who frequented them. Among the rest he carried us to the House of ——Jones, a Tallow-Chandler, at the Tobacco-Roll and Crown, or Three Tobacco-Rolls (I forget which) in Drury Lane. As soon as we came in, Gabriel Laurence, who has since been hang'd for Sodomy, began to scold at P——, calling him a vile Dog, a blowing-up Bitch, and other vile names, because P—— had blab'd out something about one Harrington's being concern'd with him in Sodomitical Practices. P—— excus'd himself, by affirming that Harrington first discover'd the Secret, and that what he had said was only to be even with him. Hereupon P—— and Laurence appeared to be pretty well reconciled. It was agreed beforehand, betwixt P—— and I, that I should pass for his Husband, to prevent my being too far attack'd by any of the Company. The Prisoner sold Oranges, and for that Reason he went by the Maiden Name (as they call'd it) of Orange Deb. He and Laurence were mighty fond of one another; they hug'd and kiss'd one another, and employ'd their Hands in a very vile Manner. — After which the Prisoner came to me, thrust his Hand into my Breeches, and his Tongue into my Mouth, swore that he'd go forty Miles to enjoy me, and beg'd of me to go backwards and let him. — But I refusing he pull'd down his Breeches and offer'd to sit bare in my Lap, upon which P—— snatch'd a red hot Poker out of the Fire and threatened to run it into his Arse.

[Samuel Stevens, another undercover officer, repeated Sellers' testimony. Mackintosh called three men who said they had slept with him and had no reason to suspect such things, and that he had a wife and child. Mackintosh was found guilty and sentenced to stand in the pillory near Bloomsbury Square, to pay a fine of 10 marks, and to suffer one year's imprisonment.]


SOURCE: Select Trials, 1742, 2nd edn, vol. 3, pp. 36-7.


CITATION: If you cite this Web page, please use the following citation:
Rictor Norton (Ed.), "The Trial of Martin Macintosh, 1726", Homosexuality in Eighteenth-Century England: A Sourcebook. 1 Dec. 1999, updated 20 June 2008 <http://www.rictornorton.co.uk/eighteen/1726mack.htm>.


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