Newspaper Reports, 1766


21 February 1766

Extract of a Letter from Georgia, Dec. 3. – "It is now one Month since the Stamp-Act has taken Place in this Province; which came out strongly recommended by our late worthy Governor and Secretary, which however is so displeasing to the People here, that they have burn'd them both in Effigy, and discontinued the Salary of the latter as Agent for this Province; they were represented by a tall thin Figure behind a short thick young Man, hugging him in his Arms in an indecent Posture, and after continuing most of the Day, hung on a Tree at the South End of the Town, they were carried to the Market-Place and burnt." (Derby Mercury)

18 March 1766

From the EVENING-POSTS, AND DAILY PAPERS, March 15
LONDON, March 15.
A near Relation of a noble Earl lies at the Point of Death, occasioned by a Disorder he got in a detestable Intercourse which he had with one of his own Sex. – O horrible! horrible! horrible! (Manchester Mercury)

Monday 19 May 1766

A tradesman of this city [London] was found guilty of making an attempt, a few weeks ago, to commit an unnatural crime on a soldier in Moorfields, &c. and was sentenced to suffer three months imprisonment in Newgate, to pay a fine of 10l. and to give security for his good behaviour for two years, himself in 200l. and his two securities in 100l. each. (Salisbury and Winchester Journal)

10 July 1766

Yesterday a Bill of Indictment was found at Hicks's-Hall, againt three Persons of considerable Property, for a most detestable Crime, for which they will be tried this Session. (Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette)


CITATION: If you cite this Web page, please use the following citation:
Rictor Norton (Ed.), "Newspaper Reports, 1765", Homosexuality in Eighteenth-Century England: A Sourcebook, 27 August 2003, updated 24 July 2019 <http://rictornorton.co.uk/eighteen/1766news.htm>.


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